Category: P.G. Wodehouse

Personificating

WARNING: In the following post Jenny exposes the nerd she is, plus The Beatles. Throughout Wodehouse you will find descriptions like this: “I waved a sombre fork.” ~P.G.W. The Luck of the Bodkins According to Robert A. Hall Jr. in his 1973 essay “The Transferred Epithet in P.G. Wodehouse” this type of construction is called…

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Bringing It All Back Around

In Jane Smiley’s 13 Ways of Looking at the Novel, she pointed out something that I’d never thought about before: The idea that if something is wrong with the end of the piece, then the problem is actually at the beginning. I thought it was a great point–it’s how the resonance gets created, the inevitability.…

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Novelists in Novels

Stephen King does it often. Apparently, Wodehouse does it too: “He envied fellows like Gertrude’s cousin, Ambrose Tennyson. Ambrose was a novelist, and a letter like this would probably have been pie to him.” ~P.G.W. The Luck of the Bodkins Novelists as characters. I’ve never done written a novelist character myself, partly because I think that other fantabulous…

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Foiled and Balanced

Jeeves and Wooster. Mike and Psmith. Wodehouse knew how to use foils in his work to get the maximum humorous results. On the surface it seems like it’s all about buffoonery placed against the wise-and-tolerant. After all, Wooster gets into one social scrape after another, right there along with his troublesome friends. Mike also stumbles…

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Taking the Trouble

“with each new book of mine I have, as I say, always that feeling that this time I have picked a lemon in the garden of literature. A good thing really, I suppose. Keeps one up on one’s toes and makes one write every sentence ten times. Or in many cases twenty times…When in due…

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